Social Finance
Young People

Young People

Social investment can fund services enabling earlier and more effective intervention in the lives of vulnerable children.

We are working with local authorities, children’s charities and central government to explore new approaches, including the application of Social Impact Bonds, to children in care, adolescents at risk and complex families.

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Essex - No Longer the Only Way

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A technical guide to developing a social impact bond: vulnerable children and young people

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Good Deals 2013 SIB Case Study 3: Action for Children

Find out more about our projects

Impact

Essex Social Impact Bond for children at the edge of care

Social Finance designed and manages a £3.1m Social Impact Bond to deliver a five year Multi-Systemic Therapy programme to 380 adolescents at the edge of care in Essex so that they can remain saf..

£3.1M TO FUND INTERVENTIONS FOR 11-16 YEAR OLDS

The Challenge

Adolescents are the biggest group within looked after children in the UK, and a particular problem in Essex. Care placements costs are high, ranging from £20,000 to £180,000 annually. Children often enter care because of multiple and complex behaviour problems, triggered at adolescence, which lead to aggression, antisocial behaviour and family breakdown.


The Intervention

The Social Impact Bond funds two MST teams, through Action for Children, to deliver a five month family intervention at home. They equip families to manage future crisis situations, improving parenting and rebuilding positive relationships within the family and between the family and the wider community.

 


The Result

The programme will support 380 adolescents and their families and hopes to divert around 100 children from entering care. Its success will be determined by the reduction in the number of days spent in care but it will also be measured against school attendance, wellbeing and reduced offending.

Evaluation of the Essex MST SIB – Interim findings – Year 2

 

Life chances for children who enter state care are typically bleak. A quarter of all prisoners have been in care compared to 2% of the population overall.

 

 

 


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Essex - No Longer the Only Way

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A technical guide to developing a social impact bond: vulnerable children and young people

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Good Deals 2013 SIB Case Study 3: Action for Children

Impact

Supporting Torbay’s vulnerable children

Social Finance is working with Torbay Council to review its existing Children’s Services provision to improve the outcomes for local children.

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LOOKED AFTER ADOLESCENTS IN THE SOUTH-WEST SPENT A TOTAL OF 2.8 YEARS IN CARE

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The Challenge

There are currently more than 1,800 looked after children in the South West, an increase of 17% over the past five years. Outcomes for children in care are poor and the costs are high. Our analysis showed that adolescents who enter care are likely to spend a total of 2.8 years looked after by the Local Authority in the South-West.


The Analysis

The aim is to understand the link between current spend and outcomes achieved, and to identify and assess opportunities for new invest-to-save interventions. Through this, Torbay hopes to improve outcomes for children by implementing new delivery models that can also bring costs into line in the short and longer term. It is hoped that there will be wider application for the tools developed through this work to plan and manage performance and reduce cost.


The Impact

In the face of reducing budgets, Torbay Children’s Services aims to deliver a suite of services that most effectively addresses the needs of local families. Torbay faces particular challenges around the number of children entering care and this will be a key area where our work seeks to improve outcomes.

The programme will help improve the wellbeing and life chances of the young people in Torbay.


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Impact

Manchester Social Impact Bond for looked after adolescents in residential care

Social Finance advised Manchester City Council on a Social Impact Bond model to develop an intensive fostering service as an alternative to residential care for adolescents aged 11-14.   It hopes ..

A SIB TO MOVE 11-14 YEAR OLDS OUT OF RESIDENTIAL CARE TO FOSTER CARE

The Challenge

Manchester has a high number of young people in residential care. The social cost is substantial– children have poorer school attendance and are at higher risk of committing crime and substance abuse. Weekly costs of a residential placement are £2689 per child compared with an average cost of £676 for foster care.


The Intervention

The SIB uses the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Adolescents programme (MTFC-A) – an intensive, evidence based intervention where young people live with specially trained foster parents who are supported around the clock.  Each set of foster parents looks after one child for 9-12 months, concentrating on behaviour management and the skills needed to live in a family setting. The programme prioritises 11-14 year olds.


The Impact

The aim is to promote emotional stability among young people.  It is expected that 66% of young people will complete their individual programmes and move on to family-based placements.

The aim is to promote emotional stability among young people.  It is expected that 66% of young people will complete their individual programmes and move on to family-based placements.


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Impact

Greater Manchester early years interventions

Social Finance developed a financial model and cost-benefit analysis for a new way of delivering early years services in Greater Manchester.  This involves an eight-stage assessment pathway for al..

EARLY YEARS PROGRAMMES CAN ALLEVIATE SECOND GENERATION POVERTY

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The Challenge

The early years (0-4) are increasingly seen as the best opportunity to improve the lives of the most disadvantaged children. To date, it has been difficult to assess the financial impact of early years programmes. Most evidence-based early years interventions will only look at direct impact at the time of the intervention.


The Analysis

Social Finance assessed the long-term financial and social impact by  looking at 27 outcomes that cover short term parental and child outcomes (maternal employment, smoking, breastfeeding, avoidable hospital attendances), medium term child outcomes (school readiness) and longer-term outcomes (employment, earnings and likelihood of being involved in crime). Using a 25 year financial model, we showed how the benefits of the programme would accrue, over time, to the various different public sector agencies.


The Impact

Greater Manchester will pilot a programme of early years interventions focusing more heavily on evaluation and data capture to support the case for a wider roll-out. It is hoped that the New Delivery Model will help alleviate second-generation poverty and deprivation for around 1600 of the most disadvantaged children in Greater Manchester each year.

“Early years is a key element of the Greater Manchester public service reform programme. We were impressed by the depth, rigour and quality of the Social Finance modelling.” James Binks, Strategic Lead, Public Service Reform


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Impact

CVAA/ Baker Tilly “It’s all about me” Adoption Social Impact Bond

Social Finance supported the Consortium of Voluntary Adoption Agencies and Baker Tilly to develop a Social Impact Bond to enable adoptions of ‘harder-to-place’ children. This Social Impact Bond..

ADOPTIVE PARENTS FIND IT DIFFICULT TO LOOK AFTER TROUBLED CHILDREN

The Challenge

Thousands of hard-to-place children are unsuccessful in their search for an adoptive family. The hardest children to place include those from a Black or Ethnic Minority background, in sibling groups, older than four or who exhibit particular trauma and developmental issues.  Faced with significant placement challenges, resource-constrained Local Authorities often focus on finding permanent families for children with lower needs levels.


The Intervention

These children need a special kind of parenting that embeds therapy and the missing developmental experiences in their everyday life. This requires parents who are carefully sourced for their resilience and capabilities, and who are appropriately trained and well supported. The search for parents will be child-centred and will focus on the complex needs of each child.


The Impact

These additional services will allow a consortium of Voluntary Adoption Agencies to recruit more parents for harder-to-place children and offer the support and training required for a stable, permanent placement.

There were 2,736 children from England and Wales on the National Adoption Register, a significant number of which never find permanent families.


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